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Arlington/Alexandria – It's Read All Over!

COMPANY’S ALWAYS COMING TO THE ALEXANDRIA WATERFRONT

Posted on | August 16, 2015 | No Comments

By Kris Gilbertson

Charlotte Hall, Vice President of the Pootmac Riverboat Company stands before the company's flagship vessel, Cherry Blossom.  Photo by Harry Merritt.

Charlotte Hall, Vice President of the Pootmac Riverboat Company stands before the company’s flagship vessel, Cherry Blossom. Photo by Harry Merritt.

Driving to her office on the morning of a chartered wedding cruise, Charlotte Hall, Vice President of the Potomac Riverboat Company (PRC), came upon a group of tuxedoed young men at the corner of Franklin and S. Union Streets. They’d been part of a rehearsal dinner the night before on Cherry Blossom. She asked what they were doing so far south. Their answer: “We can’t find the boat.”

Hall packed them into her car along with her Rottweiler and delivered the groomsmen to the City Marina, and the wedding, on time. “Even today,” she says, “there are people who still don’t know there’s anything behind the Torpedo Factory.” Read more

Keeping Tradition Alive at the Old Town Farmers Market

Posted on | July 17, 2015 | No Comments

By Kris Gilbertson

Doris (Dove) Cassedy, Lenard Dove, Stacey (Cassedy) Petitt, Charlie Petitt, Robbie Petitt. Photo by Harry Merritt

Doris (Dove) Cassedy, Lenard Dove, Stacey (Cassedy) Petitt, Charlie Petitt, Robbie Petitt. Photo by Harry Merritt

It’s common lore in Alexandria that the Saturday morning farmers market on Market Square is the oldest farmers market in the U.S. continuously held at the same site, and dates from 1751. Less well known is the robust and diverse roles, on open ground and in buildings, that Market Square (the city block bordered by Royal, King, Cameron, and Fairfax Streets) played as the heart of Alexandria, which is what the planners intended.

The square has been a meeting place for assemblies called by the town crier, and a marshaling area for militia and later for professional soldiers. It has been the site of the county seat, a school, a jail (including stocks and pillory), a museum, an open-air horse market, numerous small businesses, the Alexandria Gazette, and one of George Washington’s favorite taverns. Just to name a few. But through all the uses and changes over 264 years, the one constant has been the farmers market. Read more

MEGGROLLS—A CREATIVE CONCEPT KEEPS ON ROLLING!

Posted on | May 23, 2015 | No Comments

Cover photoBy Kris Gilbertson
Meghan Baroody, owner and driving force behind Meggrolls is a native Alexandrian, part of a “giant family” of Lebanese/Irish/English heritage. “My dad was born and raised in Alexandria as well,” she says, “and Mom was born in Southeast DC. She’s the oldest of five; Dad is youngest boy of eight; I am the youngest of six. All my siblings have ‘normal’ jobs, like teachers, lawyers, business developers, mothers, fathers—all my siblings have children. I have Meggrolls.” Read more

Facebook Leads New York Times Bestseller Cokie Roberts To Choose Old Town Artist for Book Cover

Posted on | May 13, 2015 | No Comments

Todd Healy and Cokie Roberts at the National Archives in April.  Courtesy photo.

Todd Healy and Cokie Roberts at the National Archives in April. Courtesy photo.

Harper Collins found Todd Healy via Facebook. Spotting a hand-colored bird’s-eye view of Washington, D.C. with the Capitol in the foreground (circa 1861) on Healy’s www.capitolartifacts.com site, they asked his permission to use it for an upcoming book cover’s jacket. Cokie Roberts was penning a new tome, and they thought it was a perfect fit.

“It’s such a privilege to have my work featured on Cokie Roberts’ new book,” Healy said. “She is a national treasure, incredible writer and historian, and I’m humbled she is using one of my
drawings. ” Healy said.

Healy’s image is a rare and stunning drawing of the Capitol under construction, colored to convey the busy seat of government against a backdrop of farm country in the early stages of the city’s
development.

“When I started Capitol Artifacts, it was my intention to bring to life some of the national landmarks of this important era,” Healy said. “I’m thrilled more people will get to see the 1861 image, thanks to Cokie’s book.”

Capital Dames, The Civil War and the Women of Washington, 1848-1868, is a companion to
Roberts’ New York Times best-selling works, Founding Mothers and Ladies of Liberty. Roberts marks the
sesquicentennial of the Civil War by offering a riveting look at Washington, D.C. and the experiences,
influence, and contributions of its women during this momentous period of American history.

Healy met Roberts late last month at a book signing at the National Archives. Healy, a staple in Old Town for over 35 years, is the owner of Gallery Lafayette and Framing Studio in Old Town, Alexandria.

Giving back to the community, Healy also raised $1,500 for Stop Child Abuse Now of Northern Virginia (SCAN) by donating the sales of all the books that was given by Harper Collins.

Prints of the image used can be purchased at Gallery Lafayette, 130 S Royal Street in Alexandria.

The Bees, Creigh Deeds, and the DMV

Posted on | April 10, 2015 | 3 Comments

By Tom Sherman

Samantha Gallagher with the finished plate she designed.  Photo by Claire Harper.

Samantha Gallagher with the finished plate she designed. Photo by Claire Harper.

Long before she designed a license plate commemorating native pollinators, Alexandria resident Sam Gallagher always liked bees. Even in grade school, when her primordial instincts should have been acutely aware of their evolutionary danger. Read more

SPORTS TALK by Pat Malone

Posted on | August 26, 2015 | No Comments

“LET’S GO NATS!”

The long hot dog days of August are here and many of us who follow baseball look at a landscape that once held great promise for the Washington Nationals now see it all seemingly go adrift.

Sports Talk Photo‘Adrift,’ I say? Yes, adrift, as many local and national publications touted the Washington Nationals as ‘the team to beat’, this year, almost a ‘mortal-lock’ (Think of the bar scene in the movie ‘Let It Ride’) to win the World Series, but, alas, as things often come about in sports prognostication, predictions of a post-season parade down Pennsylvania Avenue look somewhat bleak, at least for this season. Read more

Sonoma Cellar

Posted on | August 21, 2015 | No Comments

by Debby Critchley

Rick and Elizabeth Myllenbeck. Photo by Debby Critchley.

Rick and Elizabeth Myllenbeck. Photo by Debby Critchley.

Rick and Elizabeth Myllenbeck won’t admit to love at first sight when they met at a California winery. Sparks flew, but Rick’s job had him leaving three days later for Northern Virginia. However, love prevailed, they married, and moved to Old Town Alexandria. Now their second love, wine, is taking up most of their time. Newly opened Sonoma Cellar, LLC (soft opening mid-August) is an on/off premises California-inspired wine tasting room and bistro located at 207 King Street. They have transformed the more than 200-year-old building into a two-story restaurant and wine tasting room. “It has a great structural shell,” said Elizabeth. They created a California feel to both the building and cuisine while maintaining the antique feel while adding modern warmth. You’ll gasp at the beautiful curly maple bar built by local Casey Cromwell using wood from the Mount Vernon Estate, and marvel over the original fireplace and tiles in the main room. Read more

GREGG ALLMAN: THE ROAD DOES GO ON

Posted on | August 13, 2015 | No Comments

(photo courtesy Danny Clinch)

(photo courtesy Danny Clinch)

Lucky for us, Gregg Allman is largely at peace with his past, present and future. 

By Steve Houk

Last fall, when the sun finally set and the legendary churning rock and roll steam train that was The Allman Brothers Band pulled into its last station, at least Gregg Allman knew it was coming.

The band desperately wanted to go out with a bang and not a whimper, and thanks to Allman, his longest standing brothers-in-arms Jaimoe Johanson and Butch Trucks, and his superb newer additions, the dynamic duo of Warren Haynes and Derek Trucks, they did just that, closing out an unparalleled 40-year run with a full compliment of grace, power and dignity. It wasn’t an easy close, as Trucks has told me himself, but after facing some hard realities, they managed to usher the band out beautifully. Read more

2,000 Sweaters Donated to World Vision

Posted on | August 10, 2015 | No Comments

By Kris Gilbertson

Knit for Kids coordinator Peg Lorenz (l) with Goodwin House Foundation Director of Development Marcia Saumweber, who said “I get joy out of helping people, and here that’s part of my job.” Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

Knit for Kids coordinator Peg Lorenz (l) with Goodwin House Foundation Director of Development Marcia Saumweber, who said “I get joy out of helping people, and here that’s part of my job.” Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

In a sunny, inviting atrium, Goodwin House Baileys Crossroads (GHBC) marked a milestone July 14 at a punch and cookies reception for some 40 people. Since 2006, resident members of the Knit for Kids Committee have knit or crocheted 2,032 (and counting) children’s sweaters for donation to the international relief organization World Vision.

A sample of the children’s sweaters sent worldwide. Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

A sample of the children’s sweaters sent worldwide. Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

The knitting group gathers for an hour weekly in a GHBC conference room, but members also work on sweaters on their own time. GHBC Executive Director Linda Lateana noted that at every meeting held, their hands are always busy.

Resident Elsa Edwards has been knitting for 80 years and says this is the “most fun committee in the place.” Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

Resident Elsa Edwards has been knitting for 80 years and says this is the “most fun committee in the place.” Photo by Kris Gilbertson.

Resident Peg Lorenz coordinates the 20 to 25 member knitting group, which is supported in part by a grant from the Goodwin House Foundation Quality of Life initiative. Through World Vision, sweaters have gone to children in Central and South America, Africa, Eastern Europe, and the U.S. For many children, a hand-made item isn’t just a sweater; it’s a symbol of support for a better future.

 

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